“The start,” 1897.
Library of Congress, LC-USZ62-93792.

“The start,” 1897.

Library of Congress, LC-USZ62-93792.

成海璃子 | Riko Narumi

成海璃子 | Riko Narumi

through the lens of Terry Richardson

through the lens of Terry Richardson

wayayaya:

(via 0024h)(via choccoto)(via ckeiskei)(via wayayaya)

(via imgTumble)

wayayaya:

(via 0024h)

(via choccoto)

(via ckeiskei)

(via wayayaya)

(via imgTumble)

youmightfindyourself:

Golconda (in French, Golconde) is an oil painting on canvas by Belgian surrealist René Magritte, painted in 1953. It is usually housed at the Menil Collection in Houston, Texas.
The piece depicts a scene of nearly identical men dressed in dark overcoats and bowler hats, who seem to be drops of heavy rain (or to be floating like helium balloons, though there is no actual indication of motion), against a backdrop of buildings and blue sky. The men are spaced in hexagonal grids facing the viewpoint and receding back in grid layers.
Magritte himself lived in a similar suburban environment, and dressed in a similar fashion. The bowler hat was a common feature of much of his work, and appears in paintings like The Son of Man.
Charly Herscovici, who was bequeathed copyright on the artist’s works, commented on Golconda:

“Magritte was fascinated by the seductiveness of images. Ordinarily, you see a picture of something and you believe in it, you are seduced by it; you take its honesty for granted. But Magritte knew that representations of things can lie. These images of men aren’t men, just pictures of them, so they don’t have to follow any rules. This painting is fun, but it also makes us aware of the falsity of representation.”

As was often the case with Magritte’s works, the title Golconda was found by his poet friend Louis Scutenaire. Golconda is a ruined city in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India, near Hyderabad, which from the mid-14th century until the end of the 17th was the capital of two successive kingdoms; the fame it acquired through being the center of the region’s legendary diamond industry was such that its name remains, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, “a synonym for ‘mine of wealth’.”
Magritte included a likeness of Scutenaire in the painting – his face is used for the large man by the chimney of the house on the right of the picture.

(via imgTumble)

youmightfindyourself:

Golconda (in FrenchGolconde) is an oil painting on canvas by Belgian surrealist René Magritte, painted in 1953. It is usually housed at the Menil Collection in Houston, Texas.

The piece depicts a scene of nearly identical men dressed in dark overcoats and bowler hats, who seem to be drops of heavy rain (or to be floating like helium balloons, though there is no actual indication of motion), against a backdrop of buildings and blue sky. The men are spaced in hexagonal grids facing the viewpoint and receding back in grid layers.

Magritte himself lived in a similar suburban environment, and dressed in a similar fashion. The bowler hat was a common feature of much of his work, and appears in paintings like The Son of Man.

Charly Herscovici, who was bequeathed copyright on the artist’s works, commented on Golconda:

“Magritte was fascinated by the seductiveness of images. Ordinarily, you see a picture of something and you believe in it, you are seduced by it; you take its honesty for granted. But Magritte knew that representations of things can lie. These images of men aren’t men, just pictures of them, so they don’t have to follow any rules. This painting is fun, but it also makes us aware of the falsity of representation.”

As was often the case with Magritte’s works, the title Golconda was found by his poet friend Louis ScutenaireGolconda is a ruined city in the state of Andhra PradeshIndia, near Hyderabad, which from the mid-14th century until the end of the 17th was the capital of two successive kingdoms; the fame it acquired through being the center of the region’s legendary diamond industry was such that its name remains, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, “a synonym for ‘mine of wealth’.”

Magritte included a likeness of Scutenaire in the painting – his face is used for the large man by the chimney of the house on the right of the picture.

(via imgTumble)

Giza.

- Bryant Eslava 

Giza.

- Bryant Eslava 

Kiefer Sutherland & Ray Liotta, at a wedding, Santa Barbara, CA, 2001.
* - Photography by Michael Tighe 

Kiefer Sutherland & Ray Liotta, at a wedding, Santa Barbara, CA, 2001.

* - Photography by Michael Tighe 

- Mary Oliver, The Uses Of Sorrow
[underpaidgenius.] 

Mary Oliver, The Uses Of Sorrow

[underpaidgenius.] 

Switzerland, by Dana Kyndrová

Switzerland, by Dana Kyndrová